Export selected to
Endnote
Reference Manager
Procite
Medlars Format
RefWorks Format
BibTex Format
  Most popular articles (Since June 10, 2010)

 
 
  Archives   Most popular articles   Most cited articles
 
Hide all abstracts  Show selected abstracts  Export selected to
  Viewed PDF Cited
REVIEW ARTICLES
Role of curcumin in systemic and oral health: An overview
Monika Nagpal, Shaveta Sood
January-June 2013, 4(1):3-7
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.107253  PMID:23633828
Various modalities of treatment are available for different dental diseases, but the major drawback of these conventional drug therapies is the numerous side effects associated with their use. This has led to renewed interest in the discovery of novel anti-infective natural compounds derived from plants. Plants have been the major source of medicine since the time immemorial. Turmeric has been attributed a number of medicinal properties in the traditional system of medicine. The objective of this article is to review the efficacy of turmeric herb in maintenance of oral health, in particular, and overall health, in general. Turmeric, a rhizome of Curcuma longa, is a herb known for its medicinal properties and is a more acceptable and viable option for a common man. It has proven properties like anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, hepatoprotective, immunostimulant, antiseptic, and antimutagenic. Due to these properties, it is quite useful in dentistry as well. It has a role in the treatment of periodontal diseases and oral cancers. Turmeric can also be used as a pit and fissure sealant, mouth wash, and subgingival irrigant in different preparations. It can also be used as a component in local drug delivery system in gel form.
  19,196 2,542 41
Early childhood caries update: A review of causes, diagnoses, and treatments
Hakan Çolak, Çoruh T Dülgergil, Mehmet Dalli, Mehmet Mustafa Hamidi
January-June 2013, 4(1):29-38
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.107257  PMID:23633832
Dental caries (decay) is an international public health challenge, especially amongst young children. Early childhood caries (ECC) is a serious public health problem in both developing and industrialized countries. ECC can begin early in life, progresses rapidly in those who are at high risk, and often goes untreated. Its consequences can affect the immediate and long-term quality of life of the child's family and can have significant social and economic consequences beyond the immediate family as well. ECC can be a particularly virulent form of caries, beginning soon after dental eruption, developing on smooth surfaces, progressing rapidly, and having a lasting detrimental impact on the dentition. Children experiencing caries as infants or toddlers have a much greater probability of subsequent caries in both the primary and permanent dentitions. The relationship between breastfeeding and ECC is likely to be complex and confounded by many biological variables, such as mutans streptococci, enamel hypoplasia, intake of sugars, as well as social variables, such as parental education and socioeconomic status, which may affect oral health. Unlike other infectious diseases, tooth decay is not self-limiting. Decayed teeth require professional treatment to remove infection and restore tooth function. In this review, we give detailed information about ECC, from its diagnosis to management.
  15,789 2,288 86
Ozone therapy: A clinical review
AM Elvis, JS Ekta
January-June 2011, 2(1):66-70
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.82319  PMID:22470237
Ozone (O 3 ) gas discovered in the mid-nineteenth century is a molecule consisting of three atoms of oxygen in a dynamically unstable structure due to the presence of mesomeric states. Although O 3 has dangerous effects, yet researchers believe it has many therapeutic effects. Ozone therapy has been utilized and heavily studied for more than a century. Its effects are proven, consistent, safe and with minimal and preventable side effects. Medical O 3 is used to disinfect and treat disease. Mechanism of actions is by inactivation of bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeast and protozoa, stimulation of oxygen metabolism, activation of the immune system. Medication forms in a gaseous state are somewhat unusual, and it is for this reason that special application techniques have had to be developed for the safe use of O 3 . In local applications as in the treatment of external wounds, its application in the form of a transcutaneous O 3 gas bath has established itself as being the most practical and useful method, for example at low (sub-atmospheric) pressure in a closed system guaranteeing no escape of O 3 into the surrounding air. Ozonized water, whose use is particularly known in dental medicine, is optimally applied as a spray or compress. Diseases treated are infected wounds, circulatory disorders, geriatric conditions, macular degeneration, viral diseases, rheumatism/arthritis, cancer, SARS and AIDS.
  14,138 3,015 53
BIOLOGY
Antibacterial activity of garlic extract on streptomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli solely and in synergism with streptomycin
MN Palaksha, Mansoor Ahmed, Sanjoy Das
July-December 2010, 1(1):12-15
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.71666  PMID:22096329
This study focuses the significant antibacterial activity of Garlic (Allium sativum Linn.) extract on streptomycin-resistant strains solely and in synergism with streptomycin. Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1026 and gram-negative Escherichia coli ATCC 10536 were made resistant to standard antibiotic streptomycin used as a control in the experiment. Zones of inhibition of different treatment groups were measured by agar-well-diffusion assay and compared with control. Statistical comparison of sole extract and streptomycin synergism with streptomycin control had proved it significant.
  11,757 1,267 14
REVIEW ARTICLES
Regulation of adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus by stress, acetylcholine and dopamine
J Veena, BS Shankaranarayana Rao, BN Srikumar
January-June 2011, 2(1):26-37
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.82312  PMID:22470231
Neurogenesis is well-established to occur during adulthood in two regions of the brain, the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. Research for more than two decades has implicated a role for adult neurogenesis in several brain functions including learning and effects of antidepressants and antipsychotics. Clear understanding of the players involved in the regulation of adult neurogenesis is emerging. We review evidence for the role of stress, dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) as regulators of neurogenesis in the SGZ. Largely, stress decreases neurogenesis, while the effects of ACh and DA depend on the type of receptors mediating their action. Increasingly, the new neurons formed in adulthood are potentially linked to crucial brain processes such as learning and memory. In brain disorders like Alzheimer and Parkinson disease, stress-induced cognitive dysfunction, depression and age-associated dementia, the necessity to restore brain functions is enormous. Activation of the resident stem cells in the adult brain to treat neuropsychiatric disorders has immense potential and understanding the mechanisms of regulation of adult neurogenesis by endogenous and exogenous factors holds the key to develop therapeutic strategies for the debilitating neurological and psychiatric disorders.
  10,200 1,503 28
Acute respiratory infections among under-5 children in India: A situational analysis
Kalaiselvi Selvaraj, Palanivel Chinnakali, Anindo Majumdar, Iswarya Santhana Krishnan
January-June 2014, 5(1):15-20
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.127275  PMID:24678190
Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are the leading cause of death among children less than 5 years in India. Emergence of newer pathogenic organisms, reemergence of disease previously controlled, wide spread antibiotic resistance, and suboptimal immunization coverage even after many innovative efforts are major factors responsible for high incidence of ARI. Drastic reduction in the burden of ARI by low-cost interventions such as hand washing, breast feeding, availability of rapid and feasible array of diagnostics, and introduction of pentavalent vaccine under National Immunization Schedule which are ongoing are necessary for reduction of ARI.
  10,463 1,058 17
EDITORIAL
Open review system: The new trend in scientific reviewing to improve transparency and overcome biasness
Arun H. S. Kumar
July-December 2014, 5(2):231-232
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.136134  PMID:25097388
  2,850 8,513 2
CASE REPORTS
External jugular venous aneurysm: A clinical curiosity
Debajyoti Mohanty, Bhupendra Kumar Jain, Pankaj Kumar Garg, Anupama Tandon
January-June 2013, 4(1):223-225
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.107296  PMID:23633867
Jugular venous aneurysm is an extremely rare condition. The patients presented with a painless swelling in the neck that appears while coughing, straining, bending, or breath holding. Detection of a soft and compressible swelling in the course of an external jugular vein (EJV) superficial to the sternomastoid muscle, non-filling on compression of the EJV during Valsalva maneuver clinches the diagnosis of EJV aneurysm. Color Doppler ultrasound allows precise delineation of the lesion and is considered the gold standard for confirming the diagnosis. Surgical excision is indicated mostly for cosmetic reasons and symptomatic aneurysms. We, herein, report a patient with saccular external jugular venous aneurysm to highlight the typical clinical presentation and diagnosis of this rare entity.
  10,466 457 6
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Ameliorating effect of mother tincture of Syzygium jambolanum on carbohydrate and lipid metabolic disorders in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat: Homeopathic remedy
Soumyajit Maiti, Kazi M Ali, Kishalay Jana, Kausik Chatterjee, Debasis De, Debidas Ghosh
January-June 2013, 4(1):68-73
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.107263  PMID:23633838
Background: Syzygium jambolanum (S jambolanum) is widely used in homeopathy for treating patients with diabetes mellitus. In the present study, an attempt has been made to investigate the remedial effect of homeopathic drug S jambolanum on carbohydrate and lipid metabolic disorders on streptozotocin induced diabetic rat. Materials and Methods: Diabetes induction in Wistar strain rat was performed as per standard method using streptozotocin at the dose of 4 mg/100 gm body weight. Activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in hepatic tissue, and glycogen content in hepatic and muscular tissues were assessed biochemically following the standard protocols. Serum lipid profile level and activities of GOT and GPT in serum were measured as per standard method using specific kits. Results: The homeopathic drug, mother tincture of S jambolanum significantly decreased fasting blood glucose levels and improved carbohydrate metabolic key enzyme activities in hepatic tissue i.e., hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphatase in diabetic rats. Alongside, serum lipid profile biomarkers i.e., triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDLc) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) levels were significantly ameliorated in homeopathic drug supplemented diabetic animals in compared with the untreated diabetic animal. Side by side, the S jambolanum has the capacity to attenuate diabetes induced hepatic injury in model animal, which has been assessed here by the recovery of GOT and GPT activities in serum of drug treated diabetic animal. Conclusion: The result of the present study indicated that the homeopathic drug S jambolanum (mother tincture) has a protective effect on diabetic induced carbohydrate and lipid metabolic disorders in STZ-induced diabetic animal.
  10,143 708 4
EDITORIAL
The power of thought and potential of globalization of scientific research to overcome political and economic limitations
Arun H. S. Kumar
July-December 2012, 3(2):111-112
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.101876  PMID:23225970
  2,637 7,842 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Prevalence of carotid artery calcification in postmenopausal women and its correlation with atherogenic risk factors
Santosh R Patil
August 2015, 6(3):1-6
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.166048  PMID:26604593
Aim: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of carotid artery calcification (CAC) in postmenopausal females on panoramic radiographs and to study the correlation of CAC with possible risk factors such as hypertension, osteoporosis, and hypercholesterolemia, among others. Materials and Methods: Totally, 1214 panoramic radiographs of postmenopausal females attending the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology were examined for the presence of CAC. The subjects were also assessed for the presence of various risk factors and the possible correlation to CAC. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test, and P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Two hundred and seventy-eight postmenopausal females presented with CAC and a prevalence of 22.9%. These patients presented with a medical history that was laden with risk factors, of which hypertension (71.2%) was the most common risk factor. Hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, osteoporosis, and obesity were significantly (P < 0.05) related to the presence of CAC while age, diabetes, and smoking were not significantly (P > 0.05) related to CAC. Conclusion: The incidental finding of CAC on panoramic radiographs during the routine dental examination can provide life-saving information for the identification of postmenopausal females who are at a higher risk for stroke. Oral clinicians should, therefore, record a proper medical history of such patients to identify the atherogenic risk factors and refer such patients to the physician for careful evaluation and conformation of the disease.
  2,405 7,987 5
EDITORIAL
Rise in polluters of scientific research: How to curtail information pollution (infollution)
Arun H. S. Kumar
July-December 2013, 4(2):271-271
PMID:24082714
  1,989 8,107 -
REVIEW ARTICLES
Science behind human saliva
Manjul Tiwari
January-June 2011, 2(1):53-58
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.82322  PMID:22470235
Saliva is a complex fluid, which influences oral health through specific and nonspecific physical and chemical properties. The importance of saliva in our everyday activities and the medicinal properties it possesses are often taken for granted. However, when disruptions in the quality or quantity of saliva do occur in an individual, it is likely that he or she will experience detrimental effects on oral and systemic health. Often head and neck radiotherapy has serious and detrimental side effects on the oral cavity including the loss of salivary gland function and a persistent complaint of a dry mouth (xerostomia). Thus, saliva has a myriad of beneficial functions that are essential to our well-being. Although saliva has been extensively investigated as a medium, few laboratories have studied saliva in the context of its role in maintaining oral and general health.
  8,352 1,356 30
CASE REPORTS
Double-layered closure of oroantral fistula using buccal fat pad and buccal advancement flap
Ramesh Candamourty, Manoj Kumar Jain, K Sankar, MR Ramesh Babu
July-December 2012, 3(2):203-205
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.101930  PMID:23225989
Some of the traditional methods that are being employed in the repair of oroantral communication can be broadly divided into local and distant flaps. Recently, because of various advantages, buccal fat pad is increasingly being employed in the repair of oroantral fistula and other oral defects worldwide. However, there are some problems that can be encountered while harvesting BFP which has to be taken care of. In this paper, we present a case with one of such problems, its management, and review of literature on the same.
  8,802 791 11
REVIEW ARTICLES
Effect of heavy metals on germination of seeds
Sunil Kumar Sethy, Shyamasree Ghosh
July-December 2013, 4(2):272-275
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.116964  PMID:24082715
With the expansion of the world population, the environmental pollution and toxicity by chemicals raises concern. Rapid industrialization and urbanization processes has led to the incorporation of pollutants such as pesticides, petroleum products, acids and heavy metals in the natural resources like soil, water and air thus degrading not only the quality of the environment, but also affecting both plants and animals. Heavy metals including lead, nickel, cadmium, copper, cobalt, chromium and mercury are important environmental pollutants that cause toxic effects to plants; thus, lessening productivity and posing dangerous threats to the agro-ecosystems. They act as stress to plants and affect the plant physiology. In this review, we have summarized the effects of heavy metals on seeds of different plants affecting the germination process. Although reports exist on mechanisms by which the heavy metals act as stress and how plants have learnt to overcome, the future scope of this review remains in excavating the signaling mechanisms in germinating seeds in response to heavy metal stress.
  6,363 3,135 35
Protein kinase C modulation of thermo-sensitive transient receptor potential channels: Implications for pain signaling
Sravan Mandadi, Patricia J Armati, Basil D Roufogalis
January-June 2011, 2(1):13-25
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.82311  PMID:22470230
A variety of molecules are reported to be involved in chronic pain. This review outlines the specifics of protein kinase C (PKC), its isoforms and their role in modulating thermo-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV1-4, TRPM8, and TRPA1. Anatomically, PKC and thermo-sensitive TRPs are co-expressed in cell bodies of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which are used as physiological correlates of peripheral and central projections involved in pain transmission. In the past decade, modulation of painful heat-sensitive TRPV1 by PKC has received the most attention. Recently, PKC modulation of other newly discovered thermo-sensitive pain-mediating TRPs has come into focus. Such modulation may occur under conditions of chronic pain resulting from nerve damage or inflammation. Since thermo-TRPs are primary detectors of acute pain stimuli, their modulation by PKC can severely alter their function, resulting in chronic pain. Comprehensive knowledge of pain signaling involving interaction of specific isoforms of PKC with specific thermo-sensitive TRP channels is incomplete. Such information is necessary to dissect out modality specific mechanisms to better manage the complex polymodal nature of chronic pain. This review is an attempt to update the readers on current knowledge of PKC modulation of thermo-sensitive TRPs and highlight implications of such modulation for pain signaling
  7,883 1,222 21
NATURAL SCIENCE
Orodispersible tablets: A new trend in drug delivery
Paramita Dey, Sabyasachi Maiti
July-December 2010, 1(1):2-5
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.71663  PMID:22096326
The most common and preferred route of drug administration is through the oral route. Orodispersible tablets are gaining importance among novel oral drug-delivery system as they have improved patient compliance and have some additional advantages compared to other oral formulation. They are also solid unit dosage forms, which disintegrate in the mouth within a minute in the presence of saliva due to super disintegrants in the formulation. Thus this type of drug delivery helps a proper peroral administration in pediatric and geriatric population where swallowing is a matter of trouble. Various scientists have prepared orodispersible tablets by following various methods. However, the most common method of preparation is the compression method. Other special methods are molding, melt granulation, phase-transition process, sublimation, freeze-drying, spray-drying, and effervescent method. Since these tablets dissolve directly in the mouth, so, their taste is also an important factor. Various approaches have been taken in order to mask the bitter taste of the drug. A number of scientists have explored several drugs in this field. Like all other solid dosage forms, they are also evaluated in the field of hardness, friability, wetting time, moisture uptake, disintegration test, and dissolution test.
  7,314 1,659 16
REVIEW ARTICLES
Halitosis: From diagnosis to management
Bahadir Ugur Aylikci, Hakan Çolak
January-June 2013, 4(1):14-23
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.107255  PMID:23633830
Halitosis is formed by volatile molecules which are caused because of pathological or nonpathological reasons and it originates from an oral or a non-oral source. It is very common in general population and nearly more than 50% of the general population have halitosis. Although halitosis has multifactorial origins, the source of 90% cases is oral cavity such as poor oral hygiene, periodontal disease, tongue coat, food impaction, unclean dentures, faulty restorations, oral carcinomas, and throat infections. Halitosis affects a person's daily life negatively, most of people who complain about halitosis refer to the clinic for treatment but in some of the people who can suffer from halitosis, there is no measurable halitosis. There are several methods to determine halitosis. Halitosis can be treated if its etiology can be detected rightly. The most important issue for treatment of halitosis is detection etiology or determination its source by detailed clinical examination. Management may include simple measures such as scaling and root planning, instructions for oral hygiene, tongue cleaning, and mouth rinsing. The aim of this review was to describe the etiological factors, prevalence data, diagnosis, and the therapeutic mechanical and chemical approaches related to halitosis.
  7,012 1,564 27
Mirror neurons: Enigma of the metaphysical modular brain
Sourya Acharya, Samarth Shukla
July-December 2012, 3(2):118-124
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.101878  PMID:23225972
Mirror neurons are one of the most important discoveries in the last decade of neuroscience. These are a variety of visuospatial neurons which indicate fundamentally about human social interaction. Essentially, mirror neurons respond to actions that we observe in others. The interesting part is that mirror neurons fire in the same way when we actually recreate that action ourselves. Apart from imitation, they are responsible for myriad of other sophisticated human behavior and thought processes. Defects in the mirror neuron system are being linked to disorders like autism. This review is a brief introduction to the neurons that shaped our civilization.
  6,144 2,210 16
Ozone therapy in dentistry: A strategic review
Rajiv Saini
July-December 2011, 2(2):151-153
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.92318  PMID:22346227
The oral cavity appears as an open ecosystem, with a dynamic balance between the entrance of microorganisms, colonization modalities, and host defenses aimed to their removal: To avoid elimination, bacteria need to adhere to either hard dental surfaces or epithelial surfaces. The oral biofilm formation and development, and the inside selection of specific microorganisms have been correlated with the most common oral pathologies, such as dental caries, periodontal disease, and peri-implantitis. The mechanical removal of the biofilm and adjunctive use of antibiotic disinfectants or various antibiotics have been the conventional methods for periodontal therapy. Ozone (O3) is a triatomic molecule, consisting of three oxygen atoms, and its application in medicine and dentistry has been indicated for the treatment of 260 different pathologies. The ozone therapy has been more beneficial than present conventional therapeutic modalities that follow a minimally invasive and conservative application to dental treatment. The exposition of molecular mechanisms of ozone further benefits practical function in dentistry.
  6,273 1,821 28
Immunity over inability: The spontaneous regression of cancer
Thomas Jessy
January-June 2011, 2(1):43-49
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.82318  PMID:22470233
The spontaneous healing of cancer is a phenomenon that has been observed for hundreds and thousands of years and after having been the subject of many controversies, it is now accepted as an indisputable fact. A review of past reports demonstrates that regression is usually associated with acute infections, fever, and immunostimulation. It is stated that in 1891, William Coley of New York's Memorial Hospital developed the most effective single-agent anticancer therapy from nature, which faded into oblivion for various reasons. Cancer therapies have been standardized and have improved since Coley's day, but surprisingly modern cancer patients do not fare better than patients treated 50 or more years ago as concluded by researchers in 1999. This article peeks into the history of immunostimulation and the role of innate immunity in inducing a cure even in advanced stages of malignancy. The value of Coley's observation is that rather than surviving additional years with cancer, many of the patients who received his therapy lived the rest of their lives without cancer. In our relentless efforts to go beyond nature to fight cancer, we often overlook the facts nature provides to heal our maladies.
  6,750 1,136 40
Migration and mental health: An interface
HG Virupaksha, Ashok Kumar, Bergai Parthsarathy Nirmala
July-December 2014, 5(2):233-239
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.136141  PMID:25097389
Migration is a universal phenomenon, which existed with the subsistence of the human beings on earth. People migrate from one place to another for several reasons, but the goal or main reason behind changing the residence would be improving their living conditions or to escape from debts and poverty. Migration is also a social phenomenon which influences human life and the environment around. Hence, migration has a great impact on any geographical area and it is known as one of the three basic components of population growth of any particular region (the other two are, mortality and fertility). Migration involves certain phases to go through; hence, it is a process. Many times, lack of preparedness, difficulties in adjusting to the new environment, the complexity of the local system, language difficulties, cultural disparities and adverse experiences would cause distress to the migrants. Moreover subsequently it has a negative impact on mental well-being of such population. Due to globalization, modernization, improved technologies and developments in all the sectors, the migration and its impact on human well-being is a contemporary issue; hence, here is an attempt to understand the migration and its impact on the mental health of the migrants based on the studies conducted around.
  5,769 2,018 8
Preventive effects of phytoestrogens against postmenopausal osteoporosis as compared to the available therapeutic choices: An overview
Abdullah Foraih Al-Anazi, Viquar Fatima Qureshi, Khalida Javaid, Shoeb Qureshi
July-December 2011, 2(2):154-163
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.92322  PMID:22346228
Estrogen deficiency is a major risk factor for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Although hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been rampantly used to recompense for the bone loss, but the procedure is coupled with severe adverse effects. Hence, there is a boost in the production of newer synthetic products to ward off the effects of menopause-related osteoporosis. As of today, there are several prescription products available for the treatment of postmenopause osteoporosis; most of these are estrogenic agents and combination products. Nevertheless, in view of the lack of effect and/or toxicity of these products, majority of the postmenopausal women are now fascinated by highly publicized natural products. This is an offshoot of the generalized consensus that these products are more effective and free from any adverse effects. Recently, certain plant-derived natural products, mostly phytoestrogens (isoflavones, lignans, coumestanes, stilbenes, flavonoids) and many more novel estrogen-like compounds in plants have been immensely used to prevent menopause-related depletion in bone mineral density (BMD). Although, a number of papers are published on menopause-related general symptoms, sexual dysfunction, cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, colon, and breast cancers, there is paucity of literature on the accompanying osteoporosis and its treatment. In view of the controversies on synthetic hormones and drugs and drift of a major population of patients toward natural drugs, it was found worthwhile to investigate if these drugs are suitable to be used in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Preparation of this paper is an attempt to review the (a) epidemiology of postmenopausal osteoporosis, (b) treatment modalities of postmenopausal osteoporosis by hormones and synthetic drugs and the associated drawbacks and adverse effects, and (c) prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis by phytoestrogens, their drawbacks and toxicity. It is apparent that both the categories of treatment are useful and both have adverse effects, but the plant products are nonscientific and hence are not advised to be used till more studies are undertaken to ensure that the benefits clearly outweigh the risk, in addition to recognition by Food and Drug Administration.
  6,452 1,147 37
Management of intellectual property rights in India: An updated review
R Tiwari, G Tiwari, AK Rai, Birendra Srivastawa
January-June 2011, 2(1):2-12
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.82307  PMID:22470229
The World Trade Organization's agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights set global minimum standards for the protection of intellectual property, substantially increasing and expanding intellectual property rights, and generated clear gains for the pharmaceutical industry and the developed world. The present review elaborates all aspects of Intellectual Property Rights in detail, along with their protection criteria.
  6,693 834 -
CASE REPORTS
Ludwig's angina - An emergency: A case report with literature review
Ramesh Candamourty, Suresh Venkatachalam, MR Ramesh Babu, G Suresh Kumar
July-December 2012, 3(2):206-208
DOI:10.4103/0976-9668.101932  PMID:23225990
Ludwig's angina is a form of severe diffuse cellulitis that presents an acute onset and spreads rapidly, bilaterally affecting the submandibular, sublingual and submental spaces resulting in a state of emergency. Early diagnosis and immediate treatment planning could be a life-saving procedure. Here we report a case of wide spread odontogenic infection extending to the neck with elevation of the floor of the mouth obstructing the airway which resulted in breathlessness and stridor for which the patient was directed to maintain his airway by elective tracheostomy and subsequent drainage of the potentially involved spaces. Late stages of the disease should be addressed immediately and given special importance towards the maintenance of airway followed by surgical decompression under antibiotic coverage. The appropriate use of parenteral antibiotics, airway protection techniques, and formal surgical drainage of the infection remains the standard protocol of treatment in advanced cases of Ludwig's angina.
  6,212 1,287 15
  Feedback 
  Subscribe