Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine

BRIEF REPORT
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 98--101

Acetylcholinesterase activity as a neurotoxicity marker within the context of experimentally-simulated hyperprolinaemia: An in vitro approach


Konstantinos Kalafatakis1, Vasiliki Gkanti2, Connie A Mackenzie-Gray Scott3, Apostolos Zarros2, George S Baillie3, Stylianos Tsakiris5 
1 Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Henry Wellcome Laboratories for Integrative Neuroscience and Endocrinology, School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
2 Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Gardiner Laboratory, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
3 Gardiner Laboratory, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Stylianos Tsakiris
Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Goudi, GR - 11527 Athens
Greece

Hyperprolinaemia is characterized by increased tissue accumulation of proline (Pro) and is known to exert serious cognitive and/or neuropsychiatric symptomatology as a direct result of Pro accumulation in the brain. The aim of this study was to explore a putative link between experimentally-simulated hyperprolinaemia and the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE); a crucial neurotoxicity marker. In vitro experiments were undertaken on purified eel-derived AChE, as well as on adult mouse brain homogenates, in order to examine the effect of a spectrum of Pro concentrations (3, 30, 500, and 1000 μM) on this marker. Our data showed that although Pro exerted a significant inhibitory effect on pure AChE activity, mouse brain-derived membrane-bound AChE activity was found either unaltered or significantly increased following incubation with Pro. The use of AChE activity as a neurotoxicity marker within the context of experimentally-simulated hyperprolinaemia should be considered with caution and in parallel with a number of other experimental parameters.


How to cite this article:
Kalafatakis K, Gkanti V, Mackenzie-Gray Scott CA, Zarros A, Baillie GS, Tsakiris S. Acetylcholinesterase activity as a neurotoxicity marker within the context of experimentally-simulated hyperprolinaemia: An in vitro approach.J Nat Sc Biol Med 2015;6:98-101


How to cite this URL:
Kalafatakis K, Gkanti V, Mackenzie-Gray Scott CA, Zarros A, Baillie GS, Tsakiris S. Acetylcholinesterase activity as a neurotoxicity marker within the context of experimentally-simulated hyperprolinaemia: An in vitro approach. J Nat Sc Biol Med [serial online] 2015 [cited 2020 Feb 28 ];6:98-101
Available from: http://www.jnsbm.org/article.asp?issn=0976-9668;year=2015;volume=6;issue=3;spage=98;epage=101;aulast=Kalafatakis;type=0