BRIEF REPORT
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 98-101

Acetylcholinesterase activity as a neurotoxicity marker within the context of experimentally-simulated hyperprolinaemia: An in vitro approach


1 Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Henry Wellcome Laboratories for Integrative Neuroscience and Endocrinology, School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
2 Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Gardiner Laboratory, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
3 Gardiner Laboratory, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
4 Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Stylianos Tsakiris
Laboratory of Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Goudi, GR - 11527 Athens
Greece
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0976-9668.166099

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Hyperprolinaemia is characterized by increased tissue accumulation of proline (Pro) and is known to exert serious cognitive and/or neuropsychiatric symptomatology as a direct result of Pro accumulation in the brain. The aim of this study was to explore a putative link between experimentally-simulated hyperprolinaemia and the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE); a crucial neurotoxicity marker. In vitro experiments were undertaken on purified eel-derived AChE, as well as on adult mouse brain homogenates, in order to examine the effect of a spectrum of Pro concentrations (3, 30, 500, and 1000 μM) on this marker. Our data showed that although Pro exerted a significant inhibitory effect on pure AChE activity, mouse brain-derived membrane-bound AChE activity was found either unaltered or significantly increased following incubation with Pro. The use of AChE activity as a neurotoxicity marker within the context of experimentally-simulated hyperprolinaemia should be considered with caution and in parallel with a number of other experimental parameters.


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