RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 100-105

Effects of passive smoking on students at College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh


1 Emergency Medical Services Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Respiratory Therapy Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Medicine, King Fahad Security College, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
4 Occupational Therapy Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
5 Academic and Research Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Shoeb Qureshi
College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University, National Guards, P.O. Box 3660, Riyadh - 11481
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0976-9668.149100

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Background: Despite the recent campaigns to eliminate smoking, the rates are still increasing world-wide. Exposure to passive smoking (PS) is associated with morbidity and mortality from awful diseases. Although many college students smoke, little is known about their exposure to PS, common places and sources of exposures in Saudi Arabia. Aim: The aim of the following study is to identify prevalence and magnitude of PS among college students, exposure time, locations, sources of exposure, investigate the effects and make recommendations. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed to identify factors associated with PS exposure among students of College of Applied Medical Sciences, Riyadh. Results: Out of 61 students included in the study, 91.8% were found exposed to PS. Exposure in Hospitality venues (Estirah) was the most common followed by other areas. Among the sources of exposure, the highest was among friends and the least were parents and guests. The frequency of highest exposure per month was >15 times and the lowest was 10-15 times. Levels of annoyance varied between 18% and 37.7%, respectively. Since the values obtained for different markers in the pulmonary function test are more than the predicted values, the observed spirometry is normal. The percent oxygen saturation in hemoglobin and blood pressure of PS were in normal range. Conclusion: Since the properties of mainstream smoke and environmental tobacco smoke are quite different, risk extrapolation from active to PS is uncertain, especially during a short period. Nevertheless, it can be deteriorating during a longer duration, hence; the administrators, policy makers and tobacco control advocates may endorse policies to restrict smoking in shared areas, particularly working environment.


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